La Boina Roja

The struggles off a future RHCE….


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How to change Vim’s default color scheme on Fedora

That should be technically speaking relatively “easy” (notice the quotation marks  photo emo.gif?). All you have to do is open en Vim en type:

:colo torte

(torte is one of Vim’s default colorschemes, meaning this scheme is preinstalled with Vim. You can find a listing of default colorschemes here.)

But then this shit happens you get,  the “E185: Cannot find color scheme ‘torte’ photo piangry.gif

colotorte

Now what???? I am ashamed to say that figuring this problem out took me DAYS. Yes people you are reading it correctly it took me fucking DAYS  photo bonk.gif to find out what was going on.

Here is the thing, apparently Fedora comes with a minimal install of Vim, which is very close to Vi. If you want to mess around with color schemes you have to install vim-enchanced. And how does one install vim-enhanced? By typing:

su -c “dnf install -y vim-enhanced”

vimenhancedinstall

When it asks for password, it is asking for your root password.

After installation is completed, open Vim and then type the following command:

:colo torte

The colorscheme will be set to torte!

(Remember, you can always do the cliccie for a larger piccie  photo puh2.gif Disclaimer: For the sake of this tutorial I used Konsole normally I am a tty person only these days.)

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How to move pages up and down in tty in Fedora

Yes, people this lady is becoming a tty junkie  photo shiny.gif I prefer it over Konsole and now I am so glad I went through the pain ( photo emo.gif) of learning basics of Vim. There is no need for me to leave tty now, besides from doing obvious Desktop Environment thingies.

If you want to move a page up press Shift + Page Up, I would like to point out the amount you of pages you can go up is limited  photo piidea.gif In my case I can go up like 8 pages, I’ve heard you can edit this by editing your .bashrc file. When I discover how to do that, I’ll write a how-to  photo nodding.gif

If you want to move a page down press Shift + Page Down.

Let’s say you have moved 5 pages up, but you don’t want to press Shift + Page Down four times to go back to the last page. If you press Shift + End or Shift + Home, you’ll get back to the last page, from what ever page you currently are. You could also press Ctrl+l (that clears the screen).


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Recommendation: A basic guide to systemd in Fedora.

Well, since the dust of the drama has been settled *coughs Devuan *coughs  photo schater.gif we all know systemd will be the way to go in Linux. Even the OS’s that have been using Upstart will replace Upstart with systemd soon. If you want to get a quick hold of the basics then the Fedora Magazine has great series of articles that will give you a fundamental understanding of systemd.

I have pdf’d the series here (don’t hit the print button blindly, the comments of the articles are also included in the pdf. Yeah I know  photo emo.gif)

1_systemd_initialization
2_systemd_unit_file_basics
3_systemd_converting_sysvinit_scripts
4_systemd_using_the_journal
5_systemd_masking_units
6_systemd_dependencies
7_systemd_template_units

 


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How to return to the Desktop Environment from tty in Fedora

I.had.to.Google.like.MAD  photo piangry.gif to find this solution  photo emo.gif

As you know you enter tty from the Desktop Envrionment by pressing either Ctrl+Alt+F2 or Ctrl+ Alt +F3 up till Ctrl+Alt+F6 (notice how in Fedora Ctrl+Alt+F1 doesn’t get you in any tty).

Let’s say for the sake of argument you are in tty4 (which you enter by pressing Ctrl+Alt+F4) and you want to return to the Desktop Environment, all you have to do is press Alt+F1 (this key combo will return you from any tty back to the Desktop Environment).

Another neat “trick” to switch between several tty’s is the following, if you are for example in tty3 and want to go to tty2 all you have to do is press Alt+F2 and you are in tty2. Nice huh?

Btw, let’s not use the comment section of this post to debate my Google skills okay  photo talktothehand.gif


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Regarding the “Invalid partition table!” error in Fedora on a Dell E5250

invalid_partition_table

If you get this during the boot process of Fedora, you might know that pressing on enter will continue the boot process. If you however don’t want your boot process to stop at the “Invalid partition table!” error, then you should do the following. With the next installation of Fedora, choose “standard partition” in the Anaconda installer (see picture below), the default setting is “lvm” which is the cause of this error.

standard_partition

 Edit: I know on the Dell site, people blame this error on an outdated BIOS. But I still got this error after updating my BIOS.

(Remember, you can always do the cliccie for a larger piccie  photo puh2.gif)

 


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How to install Skype on Fedora 64 bit

Just to be clear upfront this won’t work in Fedora 32 bit. If you have no clue what version you are running  photo shadey.gif check this by typing this command in your terminal:

uname -mrs

This is what I see when I type it:

cliccie for larger piccie

cliccie for larger piccie

The 64 in my case indicates that I am running 64-bit. If I were running 32-bit, both numbers would have been 32  photo puh2.gif

Okay, let’s get stared  photo nodding.gif  log in as root in terminal. You do this by typing:

su

After you have typed your password,  type:

wget http://commondatastorage.googleapis.com/xenodecdn/skype-2.2.0.35-2.x86_64.rpm

cliccie for larger piccie

cliccie for larger piccie

When this is finished installing type:

yum localinstall skype-2.2.0.35-2.x86_64.rpm

cliccie for larger piccie

cliccie for larger piccie

At one point you will be asked “Is this ok [y/N]:”

cliccie for larger piccie

cliccie for larger piccie

Type:

y

After this is finished, you’ll find Skype in the Applications (under the “Internet”)  photo thumbsup.gif


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How to check how your BIOS and RAM in Fedora without a reboot

So while I was going through one of  Professor Messor his CompTIA A+ training videos, the computer I was working on started to make a beeping sound and I saw an orange light flashing. If it weren’t stressing me out right now, (I’m broke) it would be funny  photo emo.gif I mean what better way is there to test what I’ve learned so far, huh?

Well a quick Google search taught me that each BIOS manufacturer has his own list of beep codes. So step one is to check who the manufacturer of the BIOS is, I could restart the computer, but I am lazy and impatient  photo talktothehand.gif.

There is a way, of checking who your BIOS manufacturer is without restarting your pc. You can do this by using a command line program called dmidecode .  A command line program(or utility) is a piece of software that can only be opened  in, and/or used through the terminal.

How to install dmidecode

  • open terminal
  • log in as root
  • type “yum install dmidecode” (without the quotation marks)

install dmidecode

At one point during the installation you will be asked to type “Y” or “N”, type “Y”.

So now we have dmidecode installed, let’s check who the BIOS manufacturer is.

  • make sure you are still logged in as root
  • type “dmidecode –type 0”

Et voilà, there is the name of the vendor!
checkbiosvendor

As you can see in my case the vendor is “American Megatrends Inc.”, according to their AMI beep code list, one beep refers to “DRAM refresh failure” which means “The programmable interrupt timer or programmable interrupt controller has probably failed” photo what.gif

So I have a problem with my DRAM……. Hmmm, now what?

Well, I guess I have to check what kind of RAM I have.

  • type in terminal ” dmidecode –type 17″

howmuchram

(Warning, this message shows the info per piece of RAM that’s installed. I have four pieces of RAM installed, and the picture above shows info about the first piece only! (I didn’t want to bore you with a large picture). So don’t forget to scroll down to check the info of all the RAM’s!)

So I have 4 pieces of DDR2,  each with the size of 1024 MB  and a speed of 800 MHz.

So now what?

Edit:

While typing the tutorial, I took a look at the backside of my tower and there are two circles behind it, I think those are vents. Or one of them is I think, I swiped it with my hand only to get an almost “Mano Negra” so much dust  photo redface.gif!

When  continuing with this tutorial the beep eventually stopped and the fan is less noisy photo clown.gif but the orange light is still flashing…. I am pretty sure the thing always flashed, so I think I am going to leave it at this.

And yes, I am not only lazy but also gross. My ex-boyfriend, a total Alpha-male, once said about my keyboard:”Roja, your keyboard is gross, not just gross but really gross”. Ya’ll know, when an Alpha-male tells you something is gross, it really is gross  photo loveit.gif