La Boina Roja

The struggles off a future RHCE….


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Regarding the .vimrc file and the .vim directory

As you might now Vim is highly configurable, Vim is configured through it’s configuration file called .vimrc. The thing with this file is, it doesn’t come pre-installed, you have to create it yourself, preferably in you r home directory. Want to know what/where your home directory is?

Type

echo $HOME

echohome

You might have noticed the .vimrc file starts with a dot, meaning it is a hidden file. If you type

ls -a

It will show you all the hidden files and directories, as you can see I don’t have a .vimrc file yet.

ls-a

Let’s create a .vimrc file

touch ~/.vimrc

This command will ensure that I will create a .vimrc in my home directory no matter which directory I am currently in. There might not be any screen activity going on while creating the .vimrc file, but trust me it is created.

touchvimrc

If you want to mess around with Vim color schemes then you need to have .vim directory in your home directory. Just like the .vimrc file, the .vim directory is hidden and you need create it yourself again preferably in your home directory

mkdir ~/.vim

This command ensures that the directory will be created in the home directory regardless of what directory you are in.

mkdirvim

Now the output of ls -a looks like this:

lsavim

As you can see both the .vimrc file and .vim directory have been created.

*****WARNING****

I know there is a vimrc file in /etcetcvimrc

DON’T.MESS.IN.THERE.YOU.WILL.BE.FUCKED  photo frusty.gif  photo frusty.gif  photo frusty.gif

If you insist on seeing the contents of that file type

cat /etc/vimrc

(Remember, you can always do the cliccie for a larger piccie  photo puh2.gif Disclaimer: For the sake of this tutorial I used Konsole normally I am a tty person only these days.)


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How to change Vim’s default color scheme on Fedora

That should be technically speaking relatively “easy” (notice the quotation marks  photo emo.gif?). All you have to do is open en Vim en type:

:colo torte

(torte is one of Vim’s default colorschemes, meaning this scheme is preinstalled with Vim. You can find a listing of default colorschemes here.)

But then this shit happens you get,  the “E185: Cannot find color scheme ‘torte’ photo piangry.gif

colotorte

Now what???? I am ashamed to say that figuring this problem out took me DAYS. Yes people you are reading it correctly it took me fucking DAYS  photo bonk.gif to find out what was going on.

Here is the thing, apparently Fedora comes with a minimal install of Vim, which is very close to Vi. If you want to mess around with color schemes you have to install vim-enchanced. And how does one install vim-enhanced? By typing:

su -c “dnf install -y vim-enhanced”

vimenhancedinstall

When it asks for password, it is asking for your root password.

After installation is completed, open Vim and then type the following command:

:colo torte

The colorscheme will be set to torte!

(Remember, you can always do the cliccie for a larger piccie  photo puh2.gif Disclaimer: For the sake of this tutorial I used Konsole normally I am a tty person only these days.)


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How to move pages up and down in tty in Fedora

Yes, people this lady is becoming a tty junkie  photo shiny.gif I prefer it over Konsole and now I am so glad I went through the pain ( photo emo.gif) of learning basics of Vim. There is no need for me to leave tty now, besides from doing obvious Desktop Environment thingies.

If you want to move a page up press Shift + Page Up, I would like to point out the amount you of pages you can go up is limited  photo piidea.gif In my case I can go up like 8 pages, I’ve heard you can edit this by editing your .bashrc file. When I discover how to do that, I’ll write a how-to  photo nodding.gif

If you want to move a page down press Shift + Page Down.

Let’s say you have moved 5 pages up, but you don’t want to press Shift + Page Down four times to go back to the last page. If you press Shift + End or Shift + Home, you’ll get back to the last page, from what ever page you currently are. You could also press Ctrl+l (that clears the screen).


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Recommendation: A basic guide to systemd in Fedora.

Well, since the dust of the drama has been settled *coughs Devuan *coughs  photo schater.gif we all know systemd will be the way to go in Linux. Even the OS’s that have been using Upstart will replace Upstart with systemd soon. If you want to get a quick hold of the basics then the Fedora Magazine has great series of articles that will give you a fundamental understanding of systemd.

I have pdf’d the series here (don’t hit the print button blindly, the comments of the articles are also included in the pdf. Yeah I know  photo emo.gif)

1_systemd_initialization
2_systemd_unit_file_basics
3_systemd_converting_sysvinit_scripts
4_systemd_using_the_journal
5_systemd_masking_units
6_systemd_dependencies
7_systemd_template_units

 


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How to return to the Desktop Environment from tty in Fedora

I.had.to.Google.like.MAD  photo piangry.gif to find this solution  photo emo.gif

As you know you enter tty from the Desktop Envrionment by pressing either Ctrl+Alt+F2 or Ctrl+ Alt +F3 up till Ctrl+Alt+F6 (notice how in Fedora Ctrl+Alt+F1 doesn’t get you in any tty).

Let’s say for the sake of argument you are in tty4 (which you enter by pressing Ctrl+Alt+F4) and you want to return to the Desktop Environment, all you have to do is press Alt+F1 (this key combo will return you from any tty back to the Desktop Environment).

Another neat “trick” to switch between several tty’s is the following, if you are for example in tty3 and want to go to tty2 all you have to do is press Alt+F2 and you are in tty2. Nice huh?

Btw, let’s not use the comment section of this post to debate my Google skills okay  photo talktothehand.gif


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Regarding the “Invalid partition table!” error in Fedora on a Dell E5250

invalid_partition_table

If you get this during the boot process of Fedora, you might know that pressing on enter will continue the boot process. If you however don’t want your boot process to stop at the “Invalid partition table!” error, then you should do the following. With the next installation of Fedora, choose “standard partition” in the Anaconda installer (see picture below), the default setting is “lvm” which is the cause of this error.

standard_partition

 Edit: I know on the Dell site, people blame this error on an outdated BIOS. But I still got this error after updating my BIOS.

(Remember, you can always do the cliccie for a larger piccie  photo puh2.gif)